Today is Sunday, 21st December 2014

The Next Step in Creating Your Custom Space

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A few months ago we shared helpful hints to guide you in taking the first steps in your bathroom or kitchen makeover, we encouraged you to explore your style and design options by visiting our website, getting a handle on your space and size dimensions, and allowing ample time to plan ahead. If you’d like to review those steps, just click here.

Now that you’re off to a running start in preparing for your bathroom or kitchen project, the next important step is visiting one of our showrooms.

Kitchen and bath showrooms allow you to see, feel, and experience the precise products you’re considering for the specific space in your home. Our showrooms feature over four-dozen vignettes that not only display a variety of styles, but also, all the components you will need to complete your project. For example, each bathroom vignette features a vanity/pedestal, sink, faucet and tile to give you a first-hand idea of how these specific pieces will look and feel and help you avoid costly mistakes.

It’s also a good time to revisit the “Before You Visit” checklist we suggested to help effectively narrow your choices and make your final product selections.

Be sure to make the most of your showroom visit and take full advantage of all it has to offer. And don’t hesitate to experiment with products while browsing. Our showroom is designed for plug and play. If you find a particular vanity attractive but want to see how a different faucet or tile pairs with it, you can easily try it out.

Here are some helpful tips to keep in mind as you explore:

  • Kitchen and bathroom faucets are separated by style, allowing you to hone in on what you like more easily and eliminate what is unappealing.
  • The wide variety of bathroom displays showcases a number of different shower configurations and systems—take as much time as you need to study them and envision the arrangements in your home.
  • The tile in the 2,000 square-foot gallery can be removed from the wall. Feel free to take a tile sample along with your favorite faucet to a display to determine if the customized combination works for you in both style and function.

Bathrooms of old…like 2000 years old

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One of the ceilings of the bath house

One of the ceilings of the bath house

I was lucky enough to visit Pompeii this summer, and was absolutely amazed by the ruins there.  Being a bathroom nerd, the tour of the Bath House was by far my favorite part.  The city was buried by a volcano eruption back in 79 AD, and was mostly uncovered in the late 19th century.

It is estimated that 20,000 people lived in this ancient city at the time of the eruption, which was quite a large city at the time.  There were a few different bath houses throughout the city, as only the wealthiest people had baths in their own homes.  Somehow one of the bath houses survived the eruption with the ceiling and decorations still in tact – it is the best preserved building in the city.  It is actually the only building with the ceiling in tact.

Back in the 1st Century AD, bath houses were used not only as a place to bathe, but as a social gathering place.  Ancient Romans would spend hours there each day, soaking in the baths and enjoying the steam and sauna.

Inside the bath house

Inside the bath house

The baths were filled with water in the morning, and drained every night.  The first people to bathe were definitely lucky, as I’m sure you can imagine how dirty the water was by the end of the day!

The bath house was expansive – bigger than my entire house. It was an amazing experience, and highly recommend visiting it if you are in the Amalfi Coast region of Italy!

Original frescos on the outside of the bath house

Original frescos on the outside of the bath house

 

Original pipes carrying water into the bath house

Original pipes carrying water into the bath house

New Life for Old Kitchen

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My last post was all about my bathroom remodel, so now I want to share my kitchen remodel with all of you!  Last year I posted some pictures of my kitchen and asked for advice.  Well, a year later I was finally able to create the kitchen of my dreams!

Right side of kitchen - Before

Before

Before

Before

When I bought the house, I loved the fact that the galley kitchen was so large.  At 9’x14′, it was one of the largest galley kitchens I had seen.  It was also one of the most awkward and ugly!  The original yellow tile from 1923 was everywhere, and there was a partial wall that broke up the appliance wall into two areas.  All of the appliances were on one wall, making it very uncomfortable for cooking.  And to top it all off, most of the cabinets on the opposite wall were only 18″ deep because of where the doorway was located.  I knew the only thing I could do was gut the entire kitchen, so that is where the renovation started!

To make better use of the space, I removed the partial wall that housed the waste pipe and hot and cold water lines, moving those back against the wall so there is only a 4″ bump out.  I kept the sink and dishwasher where they were, but moved the fridge, stove and microwave.  To make the space lighter and brighter, I chose white cabinets, backsplash and countertops.  The herringbone pattern in the floor tile makes the room look wider, and the wallpaper accent wall gives the room a “Wow” factor.  Wondering what that hole in my custom pantry door is?  It’s a cat door so my cat can access her litter box!

After

After

After

After

What is your favorite element of the space?

For more photos, please visit our Facebook Album.


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